Contact Us | Personalized Cause

Do you have a question or concern?

We can help!!

Phone - 1-833-422-8737

Email - hello@personalizedcause.com

833-422-8737

YOUR source for SINGLE custom awareness ribbons. Personalized awareness ribbons engraved with name, date, logo. Large selection of cancer ribbons.

Cause Awareness Blog | Support the Struggle | Personalized Cause

Our cause awareness blog provides knowledge and educational information to advocate for cancer, medical, social and psychological illnesses and/or causes. 

Filtering by Tag: equal access

Equal Pay Day

Davis Orr

equal-pay-day.png

Today is Equal Pay Day,

Equal Pay Day is a symbolic day for advocates in the U.S. to show support for women in the workforce and draw attention to the gender pay gap.

Here's what you need to know about Equal Pay Day:

What Is Equal Pay Day?

Equal Pay Day represents how far into the year women must work in order to earn what men earned the year before. It usually falls on a Tuesday, to show how far into the next work week women must work to match the pay earned by men, says the National Committee on Pay Equity.

Women overall earned about 82% of the full-time weekly pay check of a man, according to IWPR. But black women's earnings were just 68% compared to white men and Hispanic women's were 62%. The NCPE says the event started in 1996 “as a public awareness event to illustrate the gap between men's and women's wages.” The goal is not only to seek legislation to narrow the pay gap between men and women, but also for people of color.

(Image: jwt.com/femaletribes ; Content: usatoday)

#fthepaygap #equality #equalpayday #wagegap #equalplayequalpay #equalpayforequalwork #girlsjustwannahavefunds #funds #money #cash #salary #women #girls #thefutureisfemale #payday #payup #leanin

World Social Justice Day

Davis Orr

world-social-justice-day.png

Today is World Social Justice Day!

Social justice is an underlying principle for peaceful and prosperous coexistence within and among nations. We uphold the principles of social justice when we promote gender equality or the rights of indigenous peoples and migrants. We advance social justice when we remove barriers that people face because of gender, age, race, ethnicity, religion, culture or disability.

For the United Nations, the pursuit of social justice for all is at the core of its global mission to promote development and human dignity. The adoption by the International Labour Organization of the Declaration on Social Justice for a Fair Globalization is just one recent example of the UN system’s commitment to social justice. The Declaration focuses on guaranteeing fair outcomes for all through employment, social protection, social dialogue, and fundamental principles and rights at work.

The General Assembly proclaimed February 20 as World Day of Social Justice in 2007, inviting Member States to devote the day to promoting national activities in accordance with the objectives and goals of the World Summit for Social Development and the twenty-fourth session of the General Assembly. Observance of World Day of Social Justice should support efforts of the international community in poverty eradication, the promotion of full employment and decent work, gender equity and access to social well-being and justice for all.

#worldsocialjusticeday #social #justice #socialjustice #equality #humanity #humanrights #equal #access #employment #poverty #socialdevelopment #protection #jobs #fundamental #rights #worldwide #change #progress #peace #prosperity

Minority Mental Health Awareness Month

Davis Orr

minority-mental-health-awareness-month-1.png

It's Minority Mental Health Awareness Month!

Today's post is dedicated to African American mental health.

Here are six facts about Black Mental Health:

  1. Black Americans are as likely to suffer from mental illness as whites. The APA reports 1 in 4 adults in the U.S. will suffer from some kind of mental disorder each year. And, African-Americans are at least as likely to suffer from a mental health issue as their white counterparts.

  2. Relatively high rates of poverty increase likelihood for mental health issues. Poverty disproportionately affects the black community, due in part to the legacy of slavery, segregation and racial discrimination in America. Poverty also affects mental health. Poverty increases the risk for mental health issues, which may then render an individual unable to work and afford basic needs, including treatment.

  3. Racism in care still exists. This is compounded by the fact that African-Americans make up less than 2% of APA members.

  4. Barriers in access to adequate health care make it harder to get help. Anticipation of encountering racism coupled with the challenges of paying for care may make the prospect of getting help daunting for black Americans. Racial disparities persist in health care access.

  5. Black Americans use prayer to cope with stress or mental illness. One study cited by the APA said that 85% of African-Americans would describe themselves as "religious," and that their most common way to handle stress is through prayer. For people without adequate access to adequate medical care, prayer may be a primary method of dealing with mental illness as well.

  6. Stigma in the community may discourage people from seeking treatment. First lady Michelle Obama addressed the need to reduce the stigma of getting professional help when needed. "There should be absolutely no stigma around mental health. None. Zero. ... Getting support and treatment isn't a sign of weakness, it's a sign of strength."

#blacklivesmatter #blackmentalhealth #minoritymentalhealthmonth #mentalhealth #mentalillness #depression #anxiety #bipolar #access #equality #prayer #socialjustice