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Our cause awareness blog provides knowledge and educational information to advocate for cancer, medical, social and psychological illnesses and/or causes. 

Filtering by Tag: mental health care

Blue Monday

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Today is Blue Monday.

Blue Monday is calculated using a series of factors in a (not particularly scientific) mathematical formula. The factors are: the weather, debt level (specifically, the difference between debt and our ability to pay), the amount of time since Christmas, time since failing our new year’s resolutions, low motivational levels and the feeling of a need to take charge of the situation.

These factors all come together in a perfect storm for a single day believed to be the most depressing of the year – Blue Monday. Although this is a pseudoscience, it does help to shine a light on depression and mental health. Depression is not just a feeling of unhappiness or being a bit fed up for a few days – which is common and totally normal.

Those who are suffering from depression can suffer from an immense feeling of sadness that can last for weeks, months, or years, and can be accompanied by a total disconnect from all feelings of happiness.

If you or a loved one are suffering from depression, seek medical help. Depression can be treated, and you don't have to feel this way forever.

#bluemonday #monday #blue #sad #depressed #depression #mentalhealth #mentalillness #mentalhealthawareness #suicide #sadness

National Depression Screening Day

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Today is National Depression Screening Day, held annually during Mental Illness Awareness Week in October!

National Depression Screening Day is an annual campaign that raises awareness about mood disorders, such as depression, and provides the public with free, anonymous mental health screenings at helpyourselfhelpothers.org.

This year, the campaign will focus on suicide prevention. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the suicide rate in the United States increased 24 percent from 1999 to 2014, making it the highest it has been in decades. In response, Screening for Mental Health developed stopasuicide.org, a resource that provides the public with information on the warning signs of suicide and the action steps to take to save a life.

We believe that everyone has the power to reduce the suicide rate by speaking about suicide, knowing how to respond when they notice the warning signs, and taking action to get someone the help they need.

(Content: twloha.com Image: boredpanda.com)

#mentalhealth #nationaldepressionscreeningday #depression #dissociativeidentitydisorder #borderlinepersonalitydisorder #bipolar #schizophrenia #anxiety #mentalillness #mentalillnessawareness #mentalillnessawarenessweek #depressionscreening #wellness #antidepressant #prozac #wellbutrin #xanax #sad #overwhelmed #tired #apathy #fatigue #exhausted

Minority Mental Health Awareness Month

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It's Minority Mental Health Awareness Month!

Today's post is dedicated to Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. In the U.S., an estimated 18.2 million people claim full or partial Asian descent, according to government figures. This group of people is diverse, ranging from fifth-generation Japanese to newcomers from India.

Estimates vary, but one recent study found Asian-Americans face a 17.3% lifetime chance of getting a psychiatric disorder, including depression. Although that rate was lower than among other minorities, the study called mental health among Asian-Americans a growing public health concern, given the stigma around treatment and barriers to getting it. Asian Americans are less likely than whites to mention their mental health concerns.

Studies of Asian-American college students have found that they had higher rates of depression than white students, and they showed the most distress at the time they sought counseling compared to all racial groups.

The most high profile manifestation of these issues is suicides. According to CSU Fullerton Professor Eliza Noh, the second leading cause of death for Asian American women ages 15-24 is suicide, and Asian Americans have the highest female suicide rate among all racial groups.

Studies also show that Asian American college students were more likely than White American students to have had suicidal thoughts and to attempt suicide, as well as have greater rates of depression than white students. This alarming trend is also present in the high school population.

#minoritymentalhealthmonth #minoritymentalhealth #asian #asianamerican #modelminority #pacificislander #mentalhealth #mentalillness #depression #anxiety #suicide #stress #stigma #endstigma #socialjustice

Minority Mental Health Awareness Month

Personalized Cause

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It's Minority Mental Health Awareness Month!

Today's post is dedicated to African American mental health.

Here are six facts about Black Mental Health:

  1. Black Americans are as likely to suffer from mental illness as whites. The APA reports 1 in 4 adults in the U.S. will suffer from some kind of mental disorder each year. And, African-Americans are at least as likely to suffer from a mental health issue as their white counterparts.

  2. Relatively high rates of poverty increase likelihood for mental health issues. Poverty disproportionately affects the black community, due in part to the legacy of slavery, segregation and racial discrimination in America. Poverty also affects mental health. Poverty increases the risk for mental health issues, which may then render an individual unable to work and afford basic needs, including treatment.

  3. Racism in care still exists. This is compounded by the fact that African-Americans make up less than 2% of APA members.

  4. Barriers in access to adequate health care make it harder to get help. Anticipation of encountering racism coupled with the challenges of paying for care may make the prospect of getting help daunting for black Americans. Racial disparities persist in health care access.

  5. Black Americans use prayer to cope with stress or mental illness. One study cited by the APA said that 85% of African-Americans would describe themselves as "religious," and that their most common way to handle stress is through prayer. For people without adequate access to adequate medical care, prayer may be a primary method of dealing with mental illness as well.

  6. Stigma in the community may discourage people from seeking treatment. First lady Michelle Obama addressed the need to reduce the stigma of getting professional help when needed. "There should be absolutely no stigma around mental health. None. Zero. ... Getting support and treatment isn't a sign of weakness, it's a sign of strength."

#blacklivesmatter #blackmentalhealth #minoritymentalhealthmonth #mentalhealth #mentalillness #depression #anxiety #bipolar #access #equality #prayer #socialjustice

Minority Mental Health Awareness Month

Personalized Cause

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July is Minority Mental Health Month!

Minority Mental Health Month is dedicated to creating awareness and discussion about mental health in minority communities in order to increase their access to mental health care and treatment. We know mental illness affects everyone despite their differences, so we want everyone to work towards equality among mental health care.

Here are 10 facts about Minority Mental Health to get you thinking:

  1. Teenage Latinas are more likely to die by suicide than African American and white, non-Hispanic female students.

  2. Less than 1 in 11 Latinos with mental disorders contact mental health care specialists.

  3. In 2009, suicide was the second leading cause of death for American Indian/Alaska Natives between the ages of 10 and 34.

  4. LGB youth are 4 times more likely to attempt suicide compared to their straight peers.

  5. Native American males ages 15-24 account for 64 percent of all suicides among Native Americans.

  6. Among women aged 15-24, Asian American females have the highest suicide rates across all racial/ethnic groups.

  7. In a 2006 study, suicide was cited as the third leading cause of death for African Americans ages 15-19.

  8. Only 1 out of 3 African Americans who need mental health care receive it.

  9. In 2012, 14 percent of American Indians and Alaska Natives age 18-plus had co-occurring mental and substance use disorders.

  10. Treating people affected would greatly reduce these numbers, and create happier, healthier communities.

(The Mighty)

#fridakahlo #minoritymentalhealthmonth #minority #africanamerican #latinoamericano #asianamerican #nativeamerican #mentalhealth #mentalillness #depression #anxiety