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Our cause awareness blog provides knowledge and educational information to advocate for cancer, medical, social and psychological illnesses and/or causes. 

Filtering by Tag: october

World Psoriasis Day

Davis Orr

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Today is World Psoriasis Day!

World Psoriasis Day's primary purpose is to act as a focus for people - patients, doctors, nurses and the general public - to raise awareness of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and to give people with psoriasis and/or psoriatic arthritis the attention and consideration they deserve. World Psoriasis Day (WPD) is also useful as a channel to encourage health authorities to offer better access to the most appropriate treatments.

While scientists do not know what exactly causes psoriasis, we do know that the immune system and genetics play major roles in its development. Usually, something triggers psoriasis to flare. The skin cells in people with psoriasis grow at an abnormally fast rate, which causes the buildup of psoriasis lesions.

Men and women develop psoriasis at equal rates. Psoriasis also occurs in all racial groups, but at varying rates. About 1.9 percent of African-Americans have psoriasis, compared to 3.6 percent of Caucasians.

Psoriasis often develops between the ages of 15 and 35, but it can develop at any age. About 10 to 15 percent of those with psoriasis get it before age 10. Some infants have psoriasis, although this is considered rare.

Psoriasis is not contagious. It is not something you can "catch" or that others can catch from you. Psoriasis lesions are not infectious.

(Content: psoriasis.org Image: deviantart.com)

#psoriasis #worldpsoriasisday #skin #skincare #dermatology #autoimmune #red #rashes #pain #burning #itchy #redness #scales #skindisease

Red Ribbon Week

Davis Orr

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It's Red Ribbon Week!

The National Family Partnership organized the first Nationwide Red Ribbon Campaign. NFP provides drug awareness by sponsoring the annual National Red Ribbon Campaign. Since its beginning in 1985, the Red Ribbon has touched the lives of millions of people around the world. In response to the murder of DEA Agent Enrique Camarena, angered parents and youth in communities across the country began wearing Red Ribbons as a symbol of their commitment to raise awareness of the killing and destruction cause by drugs in America.

Enrique (Kiki) Camarena was a Drug Enforcement Administration Agent who was tortured and killed in Mexico in 1985. When he decided to join the US Drug Enforcement Administration, his mother tried to talk him out of it. "I'm only one person," he told her, "but I want to make a difference." On Feb. 7, 1985, the 37-year-old Camarena left his office to meet his wife for lunch. Five men appeared at the agent's side and shoved him into a car. One month later, Camarena's body was found. He had been tortured to death.

In honor of Camarena's memory and his battle against illegal drugs, friends and neighbors began to wear red badges of satin. Parents, sick of the destruction by alcohol and other drugs, had begun forming coalitions. Some of these new coalitions took Camarena as their model and embraced his belief that one person can make a difference. These coalitions also adopted the symbol of Camarena's memory, the red ribbon.

In 1988, NFP sponsored the first National Red Ribbon Celebration. Today, the Red Ribbon serves as a catalyst to mobilize communities to educate youth and encourage participation in drug prevention activities. Since that time, the campaign has reached millions of U.S. children and families. The National Family Partnership (NFP) and its network of individuals and organizations continue to deliver his message of hope to millions of people every year, through the National Red Ribbon Campaign.

(Content: redribbon.org Image: thebody.com)

#redribbonweek #drugs #dare #d.a.r.e. #drugsandalcohol #drugfree #drugfreestrength #dontdodrugs #justsayno #alcohol #addiction #alcoholic #addicted #opiates #narcotics #cocaine

World Osteoporosis Day

Davis Orr

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Today is World Osteoporosis Day!

World Osteoporosis Day takes place every year on October 20, launching a year-long campaign dedicated to raising global awareness of the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis and metabolic bone disease. Organized by the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) every year, World Osteoporosis Day involves campaigns by national osteoporosis patient societies from around the world with activities in over 90 countries.

Osteoporosis is a bone disease that occurs when the body loses too much bone, makes too little bone, or both. As a result, bones become weak and may break from a fall or, in serious cases, from sneezing or minor bumps.

About 54 million Americans have osteoporosis and low bone mass, placing them at increased risk for osteoporosis. Studies suggest that approximately one in two women and up to one in four men age 50 and older will break a bone due to osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis may limit mobility, which often leads to feelings of isolation or depression. Additionally, twenty percent of seniors who break a hip die within one year from either complications related to the broken bone itself or the surgery to repair it. Many patients require long-term nursing home care.

If you are over 50, you should talk to your doctor about screening and preventative measures to avoid fractures and osteoporosis related injury.

(Content: nof.org Image: newsiosity.com)

#osteoporosis #worldosteoporosisday #bone #boneloss #fracture #hip #spine #vertebrae #brokenankle #brokenbones #brokenbone #calcium #calciumforlife #cast #xray #fractured

Invisible Disability Awareness Week

Davis Orr

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Yesterday marked the first day of Invisible Disabilities Awareness Week!

Each year, people with invisible disabilities and their loved ones come together for Invisible Disabilities Week, a time to educate the general population about the challenges they face and the progress society still needs to make towards acceptance.

It’s a time to break down the belief that people with invisible disabilities are “exaggerating” or “faking” their symptoms, and start a discussion about what inclusion really means. So this week, the community works to raise awareness of their invisible conditions and how their conditions affect their lives, as well as offer their recommendations for how to make the world a more inclusive place.

(Content: Erin Migdol via themighty.com Image: thepioneeronline.com)

#invisibleillness #invisibledisability #invisibledisabilities #invisibledisabilitiesawarenessweek #spoonies #arthritis #fibro #fibromyalgia #mentalillness #depression #anxiety #pots #autoimmune #crohns #deaf #hearingimpaired #spectrumdisorder #autism #learningdisabilities #diabetes #diabetic

Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Day

Davis Orr

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Today is Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Day, also referred to as Pregnancy and Infant Loss Remembrance Day.

Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Day is observed annually on October 15, during Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Month.

In October 1988, President Ronald Reagan Proclaimed October as National Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Month. “When a child loses his parent, they are called an orphan. When a spouse loses her or his partner, they are called a widow or widower. When parents lose their child, there isn’t a word to describe them. This month recognizes the loss so many parents experience across the United States and around the world. It is also meant to inform and provide resources for parents who have lost children due to miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy, molar pregnancy, stillbirths, birth defects, SIDS, and other causes.” One annual tradition is a worldwide Wave of Light. People are asked to light a candle at 7 p.m. in their own time zone. If someone in every time zone joins in, there is a wave of candle light for a 24-hour period on this special day.

If you know someone who has experienced the loss of a baby, use this day as a chance to reach out in a simple way to let them know that their child is not forgotten.

It can be hard to know what to say. Just let your friend know you are thinking of them through words or actions. A card, an email, a kind gesture might make a big difference.

So help make today meaningful. Light a candle, say a prayer, kiss your children, be grateful for your life and the lives of those you love. (Content: Molly Hickey Image: babble.com)

#pregnancyandinfantlossawarenessday #pregnancyandinfantlossremembranceday #pregnancyandinfantlossawareness #pregnancyandinfantloss #misscarriage #stillborn #sids #suddeninfantdeathsyndrome #grief #mourning #lossofachild #love #children #kids #baby