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Master List of Awareness Causes - L | Personalized Cause

Comprehensive master list of every awareness cause beginning with the letter L and the corresponding awareness ribbon color.

Master List of Awareness Causes and Associated Colors

All Causes Beginning with the Letter L:


L1 Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

L1 Syndrome is also known as:
• HSAS, Qqueductal Stenosis, X-Linked
• L1 Disease
• L1 Spectrum
• MASA Syndrome
• SPG1 (X-Linked Complicated Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Type 1)
• X-Linked Corpus Callosum Agenesis
• X-linked Hydrocephalus with stenosis of the Aqueduct of Sylvius

What is L1 Syndrome?
L1 syndrome is an inherited, X-linked disorder occurring in males that primarily affects the nervous system. The disease is mainly characterized by hydrocephalus, spasticity of the lower limbs, adducted thumbs, aphasia, seizures, and agenesis of the corpus callosum. Affected individuals have intellectual disability in the mild to moderate range.


Laband Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Laband Syndrome is also known as:
• Gingival Fibromatosis, Abnormal Fingers, Nails, Nose, Ear, Splenomegaly
• Zimmermann-Laband Syndrome
• ZLS

What is Laband Syndrome?
Laband syndrome, also known as Zimmerman-Laband syndrome, is an extremely rare genetic disorder characterized by abnormalities of the head and facial area and the hands and feet. Most children with this disorder have abnormally large gums. Overgrown gums may affect the ability to chew, swallow, and/or speak. In addition, affected infants may exhibit abnormally long, thin fingers and toes and/or deformed or absent nails at birth. In some cases, mental retardation may also be present.


LADD syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

LADD syndrome is also known as:
• Lacrimo-Auriculo-Dento-Digital Syndrome
• Levy-Hollister Syndrome

What is LADD syndrome?
Lacrimo-auriculo-dento-digital (LADD) syndrome is an extremely rare genetic disorder characterized by abnormalities affecting the lacrimal and salivary glands and ducts, ears, teeth and fingers and toes. The most common findings involve malformations in the network of structures of the eye that secrete tears and drain them from the eyes and abnormalities of the forearms and fingers.


Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome is also known as:
• Eaton-Lambert Syndrome
• Lambert-Eaton Syndrome
• LEMS
• Myasthenic Syndrome of Lambert-Eaton

What is Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome?
Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) is a rare autoimmune disorder characterized by the gradual onset of muscle weakness, especially of the pelvic and thigh muscles. Approximately 60 percent of LEMS cases are associated with a small cell lung cancer (SCLC), and the onset of LEMS symptoms often precedes the detection of the cancer. The LEMS patients with cancer tend to be older and nearly always have a long history of smoking. In cases in which there is no associated cancer, disease onset can be at any age.


Landau Kleffner Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Landau Kleffner Syndrome is also known as:
• Acquired Aphasia with Convulsive Disorder
• Acquired Epileptiform Aphasia
• LKS

What is Landau Kleffner Syndrome
Landau Kleffner syndrome (LKS) is a rare childhood disorder characterized by the loss of language comprehension and verbal expression in association with severely abnormal electroencephalographic (EEG) findings during sleep and clinical seizures in most patients.


Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis is also known as:
• LCH
• Histiocytosis X
• Eosinophilic Granuloma (formerly)
• Letterer-Siwe Disease (formerly)
• Hand-Schüller-Christian Syndrome (formerly)

What is Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis?
Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is an inflammatory myeloid neoplasia caused by alterations of several genes. The cell of origin is a white blood cell known as a dendritic cell, although the designation of histiocyte is still used. The mutations cause these dendritic cells to attract other white blood cells (lymphocytes, macrophages, and eosinophils) and cause a “lesion” in any organ of the body except the heart and kidneys. Children and adults may have LCH in skin, bones, lymph nodes, brain, lung, liver, spleen, and bone marrow.


Larsen Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

What is Larsen Syndrome?
Larsen syndrome is a rare genetic disorder that has been associated with a wide variety of different symptoms. Characteristic findings of the disorder include dislocations of the large joints, skeletal malformations, and distinctive facial and limb features. Additional findings may include abnormal curvature of the spine, clubfoot, short stature, and breathing difficulties.


Laryngeal Cancer (Head and Neck Cancer)

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Red and White Pinstripes Ribbon for Laryngeal Cancer (Head and Neck Cancer)

What is Laryngeal Cancer (Head and Neck Cancer)?
Laryngeal cancer is cancer that starts in the cells of the larynx (voice box). The larynx contains vocal cords that vibrate and create sound (i.e. a person’s voice) as air passes over them. The larynx also contains the epiglottis, which is a structure that prevents food from entering the wind pipe. Most laryngeal tumors are squamous cell carcinomas that start in the glottis. Laryngeal tumors may have significant effects on the voice and swallowing function. These tumors are treated differently depending on the section of the larynx where it began.


Laryngeal Dystonia

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Laryngeal Dystonia is also known as:
• LD
• SD
• Spasmodic Dysphonia
• Spastic Dysphonia

Subdivisions of Laryngeal Dystonia
• Abductor Laryngeal Dystonia
• Adductor Laryngeal Dystonia

What is Laryngeal Dystonia?
Laryngeal dystonia (LD) is a chronic voice disorder characterized by momentary periods of uncontrolled spasms of the muscles of the voice box (larynx). These muscles control speech. The spasms can result in tightness in the throat, recurrent hoarseness, and changes in voice quality and/or difficulty speaking. At certain times, affected individuals must make a conscious effort in order to speak. The most frequent sign of this disorder is a sudden, momentary lapse or interruption of the voice. When affected individuals speak, their voice may sound strained, forced, strangled, breathy, or whispery. In severe cases, an affected individual may be barely able to speak. LD can potentially cause significant quality of life issues for affected individuals impacting both work and social situations.


Laurence-Moon Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Laurence-Moon Syndrome is also known as:
• Adipogenital-Retinitis Pigmentosa Syndrome
• LNMS
• LMS

What is Laurence-Moon Syndrome?
Laurence-Moon syndrome (LNMS) is a genetic condition that results in a complex association of problems that affect several different body parts. People with LNMS may have difficulties with functions of the brain, eyes, ears, stomach, kidneys, hands and feet. They often also demonstrate a tendency to short stature and obesity.


Leber Congenital Amaurosis

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Leber Congenital Amaurosis is also known as:
• LCA

What is Leber Congenital Amaurosis?
Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a rare genetic eye disorder. Affected infants are often blind at birth. Other symptoms may include crossed eyes; rapid, involuntary eye movements; unusual sensitivity to light; clouding of the lenses of the eyes; and/or a cone shape to the front of the eye.


Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy is also known as:
• Leber's Optic Atrophy
• Leber's Optic Neuropathy
• LHON

What is Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy?
Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is mainly characterized by bilateral, painless subacute loss of central vision during young adult life. In most cases, symptoms begin with one eye first, followed a few weeks later by visual failure in the other eye. Extremely rarely there may be neurologic abnormalities, such as peripheral neuropathy, postural tremor, nonspecific myopathy, and movement disorders.


Legg Calvé Perthes Disease

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Legg Calvé Perthes Disease is also known as:
• LCPD
• Perthes Disease

What is Legg Calvé Perthes Disease?
Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (LCPD) is one of a group of disorders known as the osteochondroses. The osteochondroses typically are characterized by degeneration and subsequent regeneration of the growing end of a bone. In LCPD, the growing end of the upper portion of the thigh bone is affected. The upper section of the thigh bone is known as the head or “the ball” and connects to the hip in a depression or “socket”. This is the hip joint, which is a ball and socket joint. The disorder results from an unexplained interruption of the blood supply to the head of the femur, which causes degeneration and deformity of the femoral head. Symptoms may include a limp with or without pain in the hip, knee, thigh, and/or groin; muscle spasms; and/or limited or restricted movement of the affected hip.


Legionnaires’ Disease

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Legionnaires’ Disease is also known as:
• Legionellosis
• Pontiac Fever

What is Legionnaires’ Disease?
Legionnaires' Disease is recognized as an acute respiratory pneumonia caused by the aerobic gram-negative microorganism, Legionella pneumophila, and other species. This microorganism may also affect other body systems.


Leigh Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Leigh Syndrome is also known as:
• Classical Leigh Syndrome
• Leigh Necrotizing Encephalopathy
• Leigh's Disease
• Necrotizing Encephalomyelopathy of Leigh's
• SNE
• Subacute Necrotizing Encephalopathy

Subdivisions of Leigh Syndrome
• Adult-Onset Subacute Necrotizing Encephalomyelopathy
• Infantile Necrotizing Encephalopathy
• X-Linked Infantile Nectrotizing Encephalopathy

What is Leigh Syndrome?
Leigh syndrome is a rare genetic neurometabolic disorder. It is characterized by the degeneration of the central nervous system. The symptoms of Leigh syndrome usually begin between the ages of three months and two years, but some patients do not exhibit signs and symptoms until several years later. Symptoms are associated with progressive neurological deterioration and may include loss of previously acquired motor skills, loss of appetite, vomiting, irritability, and/or seizure activity. As Leigh syndrome progresses, symptoms may also include generalized weakness, lack of muscle tone, and episodes of lactic acidosis, which may lead to impairment of respiratory and kidney function.


Leiomyosarcoma

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

What is Leiomyosarcoma?
Leiomyosarcoma is a malignant (cancerous) tumor that arises from smooth muscle cells. There are essentially two types of muscles in the body, voluntary and involuntary. Smooth muscles are involuntary muscles; the brain has no conscious control over them. Smooth muscles react involuntarily in response to various stimuli.

Since smooth muscle is found all over the body, a leiomyosarcoma can form almost anywhere where there are blood vessels, heart, liver, pancreas, genitourinary and gastrointestinal tract, the space behind the abdominal cavity, uterus, skin. The uterus is the most common location for a leiomyosarcoma. Most leiomyosarcomas of the gastrointestinal tract are now reclassified as gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Leiomyosarcoma is classified as a soft tissue sarcoma. Sarcomas are malignant tumors that arise from the connective tissue, which connects, supports and surrounds various structures and organs in the body. Soft tissue includes fat, muscle, nerves, tendons, and blood and lymph vessels. The exact cause of leiomyosarcoma, including uterine leiomyosarcoma, is unknown.


Leiomyosarcoma, Inferior Vena Cava

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

What is Leiomyosarcoma, Inferior Vena Cava?
Leiomyosarcoma of the inferior vena cava is an extremely rare malignant (cancerous) tumor arising from the smooth muscle lining the walls of the large vein that carries blood from the lower body to the heart (inferior vena cava).


Leishmaniasis

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Leishmaniasis is also known as:
• Cutaneous Leishmaniasis
• Mucosal (mucocutaneous) Leishmaniasis • Visceral Leishmaniasis

What is Leishmaniasis
Leishmaniasis is an infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites of the genus, Leishmania. Protozoa are microscopic, single-celled organisms. The parasites that cause the disease are transmitted to people through the bites of certain species of infected sand flies. In humans, these parasites cause three main forms of infection: cutaneous leishmaniasis, mucosal leishmaniasis, and visceral leishmaniasis. In each of these forms, infection ranges from causing no symptoms to severe, even life-threatening complications. Only a small percentage of people infected by Leishmania parasites will go on to actually develop disease. Leishmaniasis is seldom encountered in the United States. Most people from the U.S. who become infected do so because of travel to or living in regions around the world where the disease is common.


Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome is also known as:
• LGS

What is Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome?
Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) is a severe form of epilepsy that typically becomes apparent during infancy or early childhood. Affected children experience several different types of seizures most commonly atonic, tonic and atypical absence seizures. Children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome may also develop cognitive dysfunction, delays in reaching developmental milestones and behavioral problems. Lennox-Gastaut syndrome can be caused by a variety of underlying conditions, but in some cases no cause can be identified.


Lenz Microphthalmia Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Lenz Microphthalmia Syndrome is also known as:
• Lenz Dysmorphogenetic Syndrome
• Lenz Dysplasia
• Lenz Syndrome
• MAA
• Microphthalmia or Anophthalmos with Associated Anomalies (obsolete)

What is Lenz Microphthalmia Syndrome?
Lenz Microphthalmia syndrome is an extremely rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormal smallness of one or both eyes and/or droopy eyelids, resulting in visual impairment. In rare cases, affected infants may exhibit complete absence of the eyes. Most affected infants also exhibit developmental delay and mental retardation, ranging from mild to severe. Additional physical abnormalities are often associated with this disorder such as an unusually small head and/or malformations of the teeth, ears, and/or fingers and/or toes (digits). The range and severity of findings may vary from case to case.


Leprechaunism

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Leprechaunism is also known as:
• Donohue Syndrome

What is Leprechaunism?
Leprechaunism is an extremely rare disorder characterized by abnormal resistance to insulin that results in a variety of distinguishing characteristics, including growth delays and abnormalities affecting the endocrine system. Affected infants may also have distinctive characteristics of the head and face, low birth weight, skin abnormalities, and enlargement of the breast and clitoris in females and the penis in males.


Leprosy

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Leprosy is also known as:
• Hansen's Disease

Subdivisions of Leprosy
• Borderline Lepromatous Leprosy
• Borderline Tuberculoid Leprosy
• Indeterminate Leprosy
• Lepromatous Leprosy
• Midborderline Leprosy
• Tuberculoid Leprosy

What is Leprosy?
Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease of humans caused by the bacteria Mycobacterium leprae. For many years, it was considered a mysterious disorder associated with some type of curse, and persons with the disease were isolated and ostracized. Today, there is effective treatment and the disease can be cured.

Leprosy can affect the skin, mucous membranes, and eyes and some of the nerves that are located outside the central nervous system (peripheral nerves). These are primarily the nerves of the hands, feet, and eyes, and some of the nerves in the skin. In severe, untreated cases, loss of sensation, muscle paralysis of hands and feet, disfigurement, and blindness may occur.

Leprosy has traditionally been classified into two major types, tuberculoid and lepromatous. Patients with tuberculoid leprosy have limited disease and relatively few bacteria in the skin and nerves, while lepromatous patients have widespread disease and large numbers of bacteria. Tuberculoid leprosy is characterized by a few flat or slightly raised skin lesions of various sizes that are typically pale or slightly red, dry, hairless, and numb to touch. Lepromatous leprosy is at the other end of the spectrum, with a much more generalized disease, diffuse involvement of the skin, thickening of many peripheral nerves, and at times involvement of other organs.

There are also intermediate subtypes between these two extremes that are commonly known as borderline leprosy. The intermediate subtypes are borderline tuberculoid, mid-borderline, and borderline lepromatous leprosy. Borderline leprosy and the subtypes are characterized by more extensive disease than polar tuberculoid, with more numerous skin lesions and more nerve involvement, but not as widespread disease as in lepromatous leprosy. Indeterminate leprosy refers to a very early form of leprosy that consists of a single skin lesion with slightly diminished sensation to touch. It will usually progress to one of the major types of leprosy.


Leptospirosis

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Leptospirosis is also known as:
• Canefield Fever
• Canicola Fever
• Field Fever
• Mud Fever
• Seven Day Fever, Leptospirosis
• Spirochetosis

What is Leptospirosis?
Leptospirosis is an infectious disease that affects humans and animals. It results in a wide range of symptoms, and some people may have no symptoms at all. It is caused by a spiral-shaped bacterium (spirochete). Symptoms include high fever, chills, muscle aches, headache, vomiting, diarrhea, and jaundice.


Leri Pleonosteosis

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Leri Pleonosteosis is also known as:
• Pleonosteosis, Leri Type

What is Leri Pleonosteosis?
Leri Pleonosteosis is an extremely rare inherited disorder characterized by unusual, flattened facial features, abnormalities of the hands and feet, skeletal malformations, short stature, and/or limitation of joint movements. Characteristic abnormalities of the hands and feet may include unusually broad and/or short thumbs and great toes that may be bent outward from the body; as a result, the hands may have a "spade-shaped" appearance. Skeletal malformations may include knees that are bent backward and abnormal enlargement of the cartilaginous structures that surround the upper portion of the spinal cord. In addition, affected individuals may develop thickened tissue on the palms and forearms. Symptoms may vary from case to case.


Leri-Weill Dyschondrosteosis

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Leri-Weill Dyschondrosteosis is also known as:
• Leri-Weill Disease
• Leri-Weill Syndrome
• Dyschondrosteosis
• LWD
• LWS

What is Leri-Weill Dyschondrosteosis?
Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis (LWD) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by abnormal shortening of the forearms and lower legs, abnormal misalignment of the wrist, and associated short stature.


Lesch Nyhan Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Lesch Nyhan Syndrome is also known as:
• HGPRT Deficiency
• HPRT Deficiency
• Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Deficiency
• Lesch-Nyhan Disease

What is Lesch Nyhan Syndrome?
Lesch-Nyhan syndrome is a rare inborn error of purine metabolism characterized by the absence or deficiency of the activity of the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). Purines are nitrogen-containing compounds found in many foods. Uric acid levels are abnormally high in people with Lesch-Nyhan syndrome and sodium urate crystals may abnormally accumulate in the joints and kidneys.


Leukemia

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Orange Ribbon for Leukemia

What is Leukemia?
Leukemia begins in a cell in the bone marrow. The cell undergoes a change and becomes a type of leukemia cell. Once the marrow cell undergoes a leukemic change, the leukemia cells may grow and survive better than normal cells. Over time, the leukemia cells crowd out or suppress the development of normal cells. The rate at which leukemia progresses and how the cells replace the normal blood and marrow cells are different with each type of leukemia.


Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Syndromes

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Syndromes is also known as:
• LAD Syndromes

Subdivisions of Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Syndromes
• Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation Type II C
• LAD I
• LAD II
• LAD III
• Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Type I
• Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Type II
• Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Type III
• Rambon-Hasharon Syndrome

What is Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Syndromes?
Leukocyte adhesions deficiency (LAD) syndromes are a group of rare disorders affecting the immune system. LAD syndromes are characterized by defects affecting how white blood cells (leukocytes) respond and travel to the site of a wound or infection. Three distinct types of leukocyte adhesion syndrome have been identified. The specific symptoms and the severity of LAD syndromes vary from one person to another. All affected individuals develop an increased susceptibility to developing recurrent bacterial and fungal infections. Additional symptoms may occur depending upon the specific subtype present.


Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Red Ribbon for Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis

What is Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis?
Leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV) is a frequently-misused histopathologic term that describes the microscopic changes seen in various types of vasculitis affecting the skin and internal organs. However, LCV more typically refers to small-vessel vasculitis of the skin. The terms cutaneous LCV, cutaneous small-vessel vasculitis, and cutaneous leukocytoclastic angiitis are all used interchangeably for this type of skin-predominant vasculitis, which most commonly presents with palpable purpura on the lower extremities.


Leukodystrophy

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Leukodystrophy is also known as:
• Adult-Onset Autosomal Dominant Leukodystrophy (ADLD)
• Aicardi-Goutieres Syndrome
• Alexander Disease
• CADASIL
• Canavan Disease
• CARASIL
• Cerebrotendinous Xanthomatosis
• Childhood Ataxia and Cerebral Hypomyelination (CACH)/ Vanishing White Matter Disease (VWMD)
• Fabry Disease
• Fucosidosis
• GM1 Gangliosidosis
• Krabbe Disease
• L-2-Hydroxyglutaric Aciduria
• Megalencephalic Leukoencephalopathy with Subcortical Cysts
• Metachromatic Leukodystrophy
• Multiple Sulfatase Deficiency
• Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease
• Pol III-Related Leukodystrophies
• Refsum Disease
• Salla Disease (Free Sialic Acid Storage Disease)
• Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome
• X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy
• Zellweger Syndrome Spectrum Disorders

What is Leukodystrophy?
Leukodystrophies are a group of rare, progressive, metabolic, genetic diseases that affect the brain, spinal cord and often the peripheral nerves. Each type of leukodystrophy is caused by a specific gene abnormality that leads to abnormal development or destruction of the white matter (myelin sheath) of the brain. The myelin sheath is the protective covering of the nerve and nerves cannot function normally without it. Each type of leukodystrophy affects a different part of the myelin sheath, leading to a range of neurological problems.


Leukodystrophy, Krabbe’s

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Leukodystrophy, Krabbe’s is also known as:
• Galactocerebrosidase (GALC) Deficiency
• Galactocerebroside Beta-Galactosidase Deficiency
• Galactosylceramidase Deficiency
• Galactosylceramide Lipidosis
• Globoid Cell Leukoencephalopathy
• Krabbe's Disease
• Leukodystrophy, Globoid Cell
• Sphingolipidosis, Krabbe's Type

What is Leukodystrophy, Krabbe’s?
Krabbe's Leukodystrophy is a rare inherited lipid storage disorder caused by a deficiency of the enzyme galactocerebrosidase (GALC), which is necessary for the breakdown of the sphingolipids galactosylceremide and psychosine. Failure to break down these sphingolipids results in degeneration of the myelin sheath surrounding nerves in the brain (demyelination).


Leukoencephalopathy with Brain Stem and Spinal Cord Involvement and Lactate Elevation

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Leukoencephalopathy with Brain Stem and Spinal Cord Involvement and Lactate Elevation is also known as:
• LBSL
• Mitochondrial Aspartyl-tRNA Synthetase Deficiency

What is Leukoencephalopathy with Brain Stem and Spinal Cord Involvement and Lactate Elevation?
Leukoencephalopathy with brain stem and spinal cord involvement and lactate elevation (LBSL) is a rare disorder characterized by a range of neurological issues. Affected individuals have disease of the white matter of the brain (leukoencephalopathy). White matter forms what is known as the myelin sheath, which is the protective covering of the nerve fibers. Without white matter, the signals between nerve cells cannot be transmitted properly. Lactate is elevated in most individuals with LBSL.


Levy-Yeboa Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

What is Levy-Yeboa Syndrome?
Levy-Yeboa syndrome (LYS) is a recently recognized, inherited, multi-system disorder involving signs of musculoskeletal involvement such as low muscle tone and stiffening of the joints of the arms and legs, loss of hearing, intense burn-like eruptions of the skin containing clear fluid and dangerous gastrointestinal distress involving substantial loss of fluids, among other issues. Most, if not all, of these signs are apparent at, or within a few months of, birth. Children with Levy-Yeboa syndrome appear to have blank expressions in their faces. This is due to the low tone of the muscles that normally reflect emotions.


Lichen Planus

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

What is Lichen Planus ?
Lichen planus (LP) is a rare, chronic, inflammatory autoimmune skin and mucous membrane disease. LP most commonly presents as itchy, shiny, reddish-purple spots on the skin or as white-gray lesions in the mouth or on the lips. Less commonly, LP may also involve the genitals, scalp, ears, nails, eyes, and esophagus. Similar to lichen found growing on trees and rocks in forests, the skin lesions are often flat-topped and can be somewhat scaly, hence the name “lichen” planus.


Lichen Sclerosus

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Lichen Sclerosus is also known as:
• Csillag's Disease (Sclerosus)
• Guttate Morphea (Sclerosus)
• Guttate Scleroderma, Lichen Sclerosus Type
• Hallopeau I Disease
• Lichen Sclerosus et Atrophicus
• Von Zambusch Disease
• White-Spot Disease

What is Lichen Sclerosus?
Lichen sclerosus is a chronic skin disorder that most commonly affects post-menopausal women. However, it is sometimes identified among pre-menopausal women, and, even more rarely, among males. When found in males, the disease is known as balanitis xerotica obliterans. Lichen sclerosus is characterized by skin changes of the external genitalia, although other parts of the body may also be affected. Intense itching often accompanies attacks of lichen sclerosus. The disorder is not contagious nor is it a sexually transmitted disease. In the recent past, a genetic component for lichen sclerosus has been recognized.


Ligneous Conjunctivitis

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

What is Ligneous Conjunctivitis?
Ligneous conjunctivitis is a rare form of chronic, recurrent conjunctivitis characterized by fibrinous pseudomembranes on the palpebral conjunctivae. It may be associated with systemic pseudomembranous lesions of the gingiva, ears, tracheo-bronchial tract, female genital tract, and kidneys. It has also been linked to congenital hydrocephalus and juvenile colloid milium.


Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophies

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophies is also known as:
• LGMD
• Pelvofemoral Muscular Dystrophy
• Proximal Muscular Dystrophy

What is Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophies?
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a group of rare progressive genetic disorders that are characterized by wasting and weakness of the voluntary muscles of the hip and shoulder areas (limb-girdle area). Muscle weakness and atrophy are progressive and may spread to affect other muscles of the body.


Linear IgA Disease (LAD)

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Red Ribbon for Linear IgA Disease

Subdivisions of Linear IgA Disease (LAD)
• Acute Q Fever
• Chronic Q Fever

What is Linear IgA Disease (LAD)?
Linear immunoglobulin A (IgA) dermatosis (LAD) is an autoimmune subepidermal vesiculobullous disease that may be idiopathic or drug-induced. Children and adults are affected, with disease of the former historically referred to as chronic bullous dermatosis of childhood. The clinical presentation is heterogeneous and appears similar to other blistering diseases, such as bullous pemphigoid and dermatitis herpetiformis.


Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer (Head and Neck Cancer)

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Red and White Pinstripes Ribbon for Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer (Head and Neck Cancer)

What is Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer (Head and Neck Cancer)?
Lip and oral cavity cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the lips or mouth. Tobacco and alcohol use can affect the risk of lip and oral cavity cancer. Signs of lip and oral cavity cancer include a sore or lump on the lips or in the mouth.


Liposarcoma

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Liposarcoma is also known as:
• Lipomatous Tumor

Subdivisions of Liposarcoma
• Well Differentiated (Adipocytic, Sclerosing, and Inflammatory) • Dedifferentiated • Myxoid • Round Cell • Pleomorphic

What is Liposarcoma?
Liposarcoma is a rare tumor derived from fat tissue that occurs in the “soft tissues” of the body (soft tissue sarcoma). It is classified as a cancer (malignant) because of its potential to recur locally and spread to other areas of the body. The severity of disease depends on the subtype of the liposarcoma and the presenting stage of the primary tumor. It can arise in various locations throughout the body, although it is most frequently found in the extremities particularly in the thigh. It can also grow in the back of the abdomen in an area called the “retroperitoneum” where, because of the vast amount of space, can effectively hide a tumor of substantial size and weight. Some individuals with liposarcoma may not have symptoms in the early stages, but as the tumor grows and advances to later stages, it can potentially compress other tissues and cause pain.


Lissencephaly

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Lissencephaly is also known as:
• Agyria
• Lissencephaly, Type I
• Classic Lissencephaly (LIS1)

Subdivisions of Lissencephaly
• Isolated Lissencephaly Sequence (ILS)
• Miller-Dieker Syndrome
• Subcortical Band Heterotopia
• X-Linked Lissencephaly

What is Lissencephaly?
Lissencephaly type 1, also known as classic lissencephaly, is a brain malformation that may occur as an isolated abnormality (isolated lissencephaly sequence [ILS]) or in association with certain syndromes (e.g., Miller-Dieker syndrome). The condition is characterized by agyria or pachygyria, which means absence or incomplete development, respectively, of the brain gyri or convolution, causing the brain's surface to appear unusually smooth. Infants with classical lissencephaly may have a head that is smaller than would be expected. Additional abnormalities may include seizures, profound intellectual disability, feeding difficulties, growth retardation, and impaired motor abilities. If an underlying syndrome is present, there may be additional symptoms and physical findings.


Listeriosis

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Listeriosis is also known as:
• Listeria Infection

Subdivisions of Listeriosis
• Listeriosis of Pregnancy
• Neonatal Listeriosis

What is Listeriosis?
Listeriosis is a rare but serious infectious disease caused by the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, which is predominantly transmitted to humans through the consumption of contaminated food. Clinical syndromes associated with listeriosis include febrile gastroenteritis, invasive disease (sepsis, meningitis, meningoencephalitis), and fetal infections causing spontaneous abortions, stillbirth, premature labor, and neonatal disease. Approximately 20% of listeriosis cases are fatal. Listeriosis most often affects unborn fetuses, newborn infants, older adults, and individuals with weakened immune systems.


Liver Cancer

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Green Ribbon for Liver Cancer

What is Liver Cancer?
Liver cancer is cancer that begins in the cells of the liver. Several types of cancer can form in the liver. The most common type of liver cancer is hepatocellular carcinoma, which begins in the main type of liver cell (hepatocyte). Other types of liver cancer, such as intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and hepatoblastoma, are much less common.

Not all cancers that affect the liver are considered liver cancer. Cancer that begins in another area of the body - such as the colon, lung or breast - and then spreads to the liver is called metastatic cancer rather than liver cancer. And this type of cancer is named after the organ in which it began, such as metastatic colon cancer to describe cancer that begins in the colon and spreads to the liver. Cancer that spreads to the liver is more common than cancer that begins in the liver cells.


Locked-In Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Locked-In Syndrome is also known as:
• Cerebromedullospinal Disconnection • De-Efferented State • Pseudocoma

What is Locked-In Syndrome?
Locked-in syndrome is a rare neurological disorder in which there is complete paralysis of all voluntary muscles except for the ones that control the movements of the eyes. Individuals with locked-in syndrome are conscious and awake, but have no ability to produce movements or to speak. Cognitive function is usually unaffected. Communication is possible through eye movements or blinking. Locked-in syndrome is caused by damaged to the pons, a part of the brainstem that contains nerve fibers that relay information to other areas of the brain.


Long QT Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Long QT Syndrome is also known as:
• Autosomal Dominant Long QT Syndrome
• Long QT Syndrome Without Deafness
• LQTS
• Romano-Ward Long QT Syndrome
• RWS
• Ward-Romano Syndrome
• Romano-Ward Syndrome

What is Long QT Syndrome?
Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an autosomal dominant disorder, caused by abnormalities of the heart’s electrical conduction system, and is characterized on the electrocardiogram by prolongation of the QT interval that corresponds to prolongation of the recovery phase or repolarization of the heart muscle after each heartbeat. QT prolongation predisposes those affected to an increased risk of life-threatening sudden alterations in the cardiac rhythm, specifically torsade de pointes (TdP) or ventricular fibrillation (VF). These arrhythmias can lead to sudden loss of consciousness, cardiac arrest and potentially cause sudden cardiac death. The severity of cardiac symptoms varies greatly from one person to another, even among family members who carry the same rare genetic variant. Some individuals may have no apparent symptoms for their entire lives, while others develop arrhythmias resulting in episodes of syncope, and cardiac arrest, at a young age. Several different factors are known to trigger the onset of symptoms including physical activity, excitement and fright, although cardiac events may occur while asleep or at rest.


Low Gamma-GT Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Low Gamma-GT Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis is also known as:
• Benign Recurrent Intrahepatic Cholestasis Types 1 and 2
• BRIC1
• BRIC2
• PFIC1
• PFIC2
• Progressive Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis Types 1 and 2

Subdivisions of Low Gamma-GT Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis
• BRIC Type 1; Mild FIC1 Deficiency; Mild ATP8B1 Disease
• BRIC Type 2; Mild BSEP Deficiency; Mild ABCB11 Disease
• Byler Disease
• Byler Syndrome
• Greenland Childhood Cholestasis
• PFIC Type 1; Severe FIC1 Deficiency; Severe ATP8B1 Disease
• PFIC Type 2; Severe BSEP Deficiency; Severe ABCB11 Disease

What is Low Gamma-GT Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis?
The severe forms of Low Gamma-GT Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis are known as progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) 1 and 2 and the two milder forms are known as benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis (BRIC) 1 and 2. PFIC and BRIC thus lie at different ends of a spectrum. The main symptom of this spectrum of disease is interruption or suppression of the flow of bile from the liver. Cholestasis in these disorders occurs due to defects within the liver rather than within the bile ducts outside the liver. Features of cholestasis may include yellowing of the skin, mucous membranes and whites of the eyes, failure to thrive, growth deficiency, easy bleeding, rickets, and persistent, severe itchiness. In many cases, symptoms or signs are present at birth or during the newborn period. The more severe forms of these disorders eventually progress to cause life-threatening complications such as scarring of the liver (cirrhosis) and liver failure.


Lowe Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Lowe syndrome is also known as:
• OCRL
• Oculocerebrorenal Syndrome
• Oculocerebrorenal Syndrome of Lowe

What is Lowe syndrome?
Lowe syndrome is characterized by vision problems including clouding of the lenses of the eyes that are present at birth, kidney problems that usually develop in the first year of life, and brain abnormalities that are associated with intellectual disabilities.


Lung Cancer (Non-Small Cell and Small Cell)

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Pearl Ribbon for Lung Cancer (Non-Small Cell and Small Cell)

What is Lung Cancer (Non-Small Cell and Small Cell)?
There are 2 main types of lung cancer. The two major types of lung cancer are small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). SCLC accounts for 10 to 15 percent of all lung cancers and is less common than NSCLC. There are subtypes of NSCLC, which start from different types of lung cells. But they are grouped together as NSCLC because the approach to treatment and prognosis (outlook) are often similar.

Adenocarcinoma: About 40% of lung cancers are adenocarcinomas. These cancers start in early versions of the cells that would normally secrete substances such as mucus. This type of lung cancer occurs mainly in current or former smokers, but it is also the most common type of lung cancer seen in non-smokers. It is more common in women than in men, and it is more likely to occur in younger people than other types of lung cancer. Adenocarcinoma is usually found in outer parts of the lung. Though it tends to grow slower than other types of lung cancer and is more likely to be found before it has spread, this varies from patient to patient. People with a type of adenocarcinoma called adenocarcinoma in situ (previously called bronchioloalveolar carcinoma) tend to have a better outlook than those with other types of lung cancer.

Squamous cell (epidermoid) carcinoma: About 25% to 30% of all lung cancers are squamous cell carcinomas. These cancers start in early versions of squamous cells, which are flat cells that line the inside of the airways in the lungs. They are often linked to a history of smoking and tend to be found in the central part of the lungs, near a main airway (bronchus).

Large cell (undifferentiated) carcinoma: This type accounts for about 10% to 15% of lung cancers. It can appear in any part of the lung. It tends to grow and spread quickly, which can make it harder to treat. A subtype of large cell carcinoma, known as large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma, is a fast-growing cancer that is very similar to small cell lung cancer.

Other subtypes: A few other subtypes of NSCLC, such as adenosquamous carcinoma and sarcomatoid carcinoma, are much less common. However, SCLC is the more aggressive form of lung cancer. With SCLC, the cancer cells tend to grow quickly and travel to other parts of the body, or metastasize, more easily. As a result, the condition is usually only diagnosed after the cancer has spread throughout the body, making recovery less likely. If SCLC is detected early, however, it may be treated effectively before the cancer advances. SCLC may also be referred to as oat cell cancer, oat cell carcinoma, and small cell undifferentiated carcinoma.


Lung Cancer (Non-Smokers)

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Pearl Ribbon for Lung Cancer (Non-Smokers)

What is Lung Cancer (Non-Smokers)?
Lung cancer in non-smokers is more common than many people realize. In fact, lung cancer in never-smokers is now considered the 6th most common cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Overall, 10 percent to 15 percent of lung cancers occur in non-smokers. (Another 50 percent occur in former smokers.) Two-thirds of the non-smokers who get lung cancer are women, and 20 percent of lung cancers in women occur in individuals who have never smoked. This percentage is significantly higher in Asian women.

While over half of lung cancers in smokers are classified as squamous cell lung cancers (a type of non-small cell lung cancer), the majority of lung cancers in non-smokers are adenocarcinomas (another type of non-small cell lung cancer). Squamous cell lung cancers tend to grow near the airways and cause symptoms early on, such as coughing or coughing up blood (hemoptysis).

Adenocarcinomas often grow in the outer regions of the lungs and can be present for a long time before symptoms occur. Symptoms such as shortness of breath, fatigue, or symptoms due to spread of the cancer to other regions of the body (such as bone pain) may be more common. Bronchoalveolar carcinoma (BAC) is a name that has now been replaced and is viewed as a subcategory of lung adenocarcinoma. It is another form of lung cancer that is more common in non-smokers, especially young female non-smokers. For unknown reasons, the incidence of BAC appears to be increasing worldwide.


Lung Cancer, Adult

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Pearl Ribbon for Lung Cancer, Adult

What is Lung Cancer, Adult?
Over 40 percent of people diagnosed with lung cancer are age 70 or older.


Lung Cancer, Childhood

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Pearl Ribbon for Lung Cancer, Childhood

What is Lung Cancer, Childhood?
Lung cancer is primarily triggered by toxins such as those found in cigarette smoke. Because of this, lung cancer is rare in pediatric patients. When a child is diagnosed with lung cancer at a children’s hospital, it is usually a secondary tumor of the lungs. This means that the cancer originated elsewhere and spread to the lungs. Primary lung tumors are quite rare.


Lupus

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Purple Ribbon for Lupus

Lupus is also known as:
• Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

What is Lupus?
Lupus is a systemic autoimmune disease that occurs when the body's immune system attacks its own tissues and organs. Inflammation caused by lupus can affect many different body systems — including the joints, skin, kidneys, blood cells, brain, heart and lungs. Lupus can be difficult to diagnose because its signs and symptoms often mimic those of other ailments. The most distinctive sign of lupus, a facial rash that resembles the wings of a butterfly unfolding across both cheeks, occurs in many but not all cases of lupus. Some people are born with a tendency toward developing lupus, which may be triggered by infections, certain drugs or even sunlight.


Lupus in Children and Teens

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Purple Ribbon for Lupus in Children and Teens

Lupus in Children and Teens is also known as:
• Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Children and Teens

What is Lupus in Children and Teens
Systemic lupus has been diagnosed in 5,000 to 10,000 children and teenagers in the United States. In adults, lupus is 10 times more likely in women than in men, and among children, girls are affected 4 times more frequently than boys. The average age of diagnosis for pediatric lupus is just over the age of 12.


Lupus Nephritis

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Purple Ribbon for Lupus Nephritis

What is Lupus Nephritis?
Lupus nephritis is inflammation of the kidney that is caused by systemic lupus erythematous (SLE). Also called lupus, SLE is an autoimmune disease. With lupus, the body's immune system targets its own body tissues. Lupus nephritis happens when lupus involves the kidneys. Up to 60% of lupus patients will develop lupus nephritis. When the kidneys are inflamed, they can't function normally and can leak protein. If not controlled, lupus nephritis can lead to kidney failure.


Lupus Vasculitis

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Purple Ribbon for Lupus Vasculitis

What is Lupus Vasculitis?
The word “vasculitis” means inflammation of the blood vessels. Vasculitis can be a diagnosis in itself, but more often it coexists with lupus or another autoimmune disease, and is considered to be a part of that illness. Blood vessel inflammation is common to all the rheumatic autoimmune illnesses. When it occurs in a patient who has lupus, vasculitis may simply confirm a diagnosis for lupus, but cause no specific additional health problems itself. Sometimes its occurrence represents a change in the course of the lupus, with vasculitis becoming a serious complication.


Lyme Disease

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Lime Green Ribbon for Lyme Disease

What is Lyme Disease?
Lyme disease is caused by bacteria, Borrelia burgdorferi that are transmitted to humans through a bite from an infected black-legged or deer tick. Symptoms can occur anywhere from 3 to 30 days after the bite and can be wide-ranging, depending on the stage of the infection. In some cases, symptoms can appear months after the bite.


Lyme Disease (Chronic)

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Lime Green Ribbon for Lyme Disease (Chronic)

Subdivisions of Lyme Disease (Chronic)

What is Lyme Disease (Chronic)?
Chronic Lyme disease occurs when a person who’s treated with antibiotic therapy for the disease continues to experience symptoms. The condition is also referred to as post Lyme disease syndrome or post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome. Approximately 10 to 20 percent of people who are treated with the recommended antibiotics will have disease symptoms that persist after they complete treatment. These symptoms can include fatigue, joint or muscle aches, and cognitive dysfunction.


Lymphangioleiomyomatosis

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Lymphangioleiomyomatosis is also known as:
• LAM
• Lymphangioleimyomatosis
• Lymphangioleiomatosis
• Pulmonary Lymphangiomyomatosis
• Sporadic Lymphangioleiomyomatosis

What is Lymphangioleiomyomatosis?
Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare progressive multisystem disorder that predominantly affects women of childbearing age. It occurs in women who have tuberous sclerosis, and also in women who do not have a heritable genetic disorder. LAM is characterized by the spread and uncontrolled growth (proliferation) of specialized cells (smooth muscle-like LAM cells) in certain organs of the body, especially the lungs, kidney and lymphatics. Common symptoms associated with LAM include coughing and/or difficulty breathing (dyspnea), especially following periods of exercise or exertion. Affected individuals may also experience complications including collapse of a lung or fluid accumulation around the lungs (pleural effusion). The disorder is progressive and, in some cases, may result in chronic respiratory failure.


Lymphatic Malformations

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Lymphatic Malformations is also known as:
• Cavernous Lymphangioma
• Cystic Hygroma
• Cystic Lymphangioma
• Lymphangioma
• Lymphangioma Circumscriptum
• Lymphangiomatosis
• Macrocystic Lymphatic Malformation
• Microcystic Lymphatic Malformation

What are Lymphatic Malformations?
Lymphatic malformations are rare, non-malignant masses consisting of fluid-filled channels or spaces thought to be caused by the abnormal development of the lymphatic system. These malformations are usually apparent at birth or by two years of age. Lymphatic malformations can affect any area of the body (except the brain), but most commonly affect the head and neck. When evident at birth (congenital), lymphatic malformations tend to be soft, spongy, non-tender masses. The specific symptoms and severity of lymphatic malformations varies based upon the size and specific location of the malformation. Some lymphatic malformations can be massive. Lymphatic malformations, regardless of size, can potentially cause functional impairment of nearby structures or organs and disfigurement of affected areas.

Several different terms were once used to describe conditions now grouped under the umbrella term “lymphatic malformations.” Such terms include cystic hygroma, lymphangioma, cavernous lymphangioma, cystic lymphangioma, and lymphangioma circumscriptum. These terms have been abandoned because some of the outdated terms imply a relationship to cancer. Lymphatic malformations are not cancerous and there is no known risk of malignant transformation.


Lymphedema-Distichiasis Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Lymphedema-Distichiasis Syndrome is also known as:
• Lymphedema with Distichiasis

What is Lymphedema-Distichiasis Syndrome?
Lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome is a rare genetic multisystem disorder characterized by swelling of the legs because of fluid accumulation and the development of extra eyelashes (distichiasis). Distichiasis may range from a few extra lashes to a full set of extra eyelashes. Swelling most often affects both legs and usually occurs around puberty. Additional anomalies sometimes associated with this disorder include early onset varicose veins, droopy eyelids, heart defects, cleft palate, abnormal heart rhythm, and abnormal curvature of the spine.


Lymphocytic Infiltrate of Jessner

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Lymphocytic Infiltrate of Jessner is also known as:
• Benign Lymphocytic Infiltrate of the Skin
• Jessner-Kanof Lymphocytic Infiltration

What is Lymphocytic Infiltrate of Jessner?
Jessner lymphocytic infiltrate of the skin is an uncommon disorder that is characterized by benign accumulations of lymph cells in the skin. These small lesions are solid, pink or red in color, and appear on the face, neck, and/or back. Skin surrounding these lesions may be itchy and turn red. The lesions may remain unchanged for several years and then spontaneously disappear, leaving no scars. Not much is known about this disorder. Some scientists believe that Jessner lymphocytic infiltrate may be a type of lupus erythematosus tumidus (LET) or discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE).


Lymphoma

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Lime Green Ribbon for Lymphoma

What is Lymphoma?
Lymphoma is cancer that begins in infection-fighting cells of the immune system, called lymphocytes. These cells are in the lymph nodes, spleen, thymus, bone marrow, and other parts of the body. When you have lymphoma, lymphocytes change and grow out of control.

There are two main types of lymphoma, which involve different types of lymphocyte cells.:
• Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (most common)
• Hodgkin Lymphoma


Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis is also known as:
• Benign Lymph Angiitis and Granulomatosis • Malignant Lymph Angiitis and Granulomatosis • Pulmonary Angiitis

What is Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis?
Lymphomatoid granulomatosis is a rare disorder characterized by overproduction of white blood cells called lymphocytes. The abnormal cells infiltrate and accumulate within tissues. The lesions or nodules damage or destroy the blood vessels within these tissues. The lungs are most commonly affected in lymphomatoid granulomatosis. Symptoms often include cough, shortness of breath (dyspnea) and chest tightness. Other areas of the body such as the skin, kidneys or central nervous system are also frequently affected.

The abnormal cells in lymphomatoid granulomatosis are B-cells (B lymphocytes) containing the Epstein-Barr virus. There are two main types of lymphocytes: B-lymphocytes, which may produce specific antibodies to "neutralize" certain invading microorganisms, and T-lymphocytes, which may directly destroy microorganisms or assist in the activities of other lymphocytes. Because lymphomatoid granulomatosis is caused by the overproduction of abnormal B-cells, affected individuals may eventually develop B-cell lymphoma, a form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.


Lysosomal Free Sialic Acid Storage Disorders

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Lysosomal Free Sialic Acid Storage Disorders is also known as:
• Infantile Free Sialic Acid Storage Disease (ISSD)
• Intermediate Salla Disease
• Salla Disease

What is Lysosomal Free Sialic Acid Storage Disorders?
Free sialic acid storage disorders are a group of related disorders characterized by the abnormal accumulation of sialic acid in various cells and tissues of the body. These disorders are generally broken down into three subtypes: infantile free sialic acid storage disease (ISSD), the most severe form; Salla disease, the mildest form; and intermediate Salla disease which is less severe than ISSD, but more serious than Salla disease.


Lysosomal Storage Disorders

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

What is Lysosomal Storage Disorders?
Lysosomal storage diseases are inherited metabolic diseases that are characterized by an abnormal build-up of various toxic materials in the body's cells as a result of enzyme deficiencies. There are nearly 50 of these disorders altogether, and they may affect different parts of the body, including the skeleton, brain, skin, heart, and central nervous system. New lysosomal storage disorders continue to be identified.