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Master List of Awareness Causes - W | Personalized Cause

Comprehensive master list of every awareness cause beginning with the letter W and the corresponding awareness ribbon color.

Master List of Awareness Causes and Associated Colors

All Causes Beginning with the Letter W:


Waardenburg Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Waardenburg Syndrome is also known as:
• WS

Subdivisions of Waardenburg Syndrome
• Waardenburg syndrome type IIA (WS2A)
• Waardenburg syndrome type IIB (WS2B)
• Waardenburg syndrome type III (WS3)
• Waardenburg syndrome type II (WS2)
• Waardenburg syndrome type IV (WS4)
• Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1)

What is Waardenburg Syndrome?
Waardenburg syndrome is a genetic disorder that may be evident at birth. The range and severity of associated symptoms and findings may vary greatly from case to case. However, primary features often include distinctive facial abnormalities; unusually diminished coloration of the hair, the skin, and/or the iris of both eyes; and/or congenital deafness.


WAGR Syndrome/11p Deletion Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

WAGR Syndrome/11p Deletion Syndrome is also known as:
• Chromosome 11p Deletion Syndrome
• WAGR Complex

Subdivisions of WAGR Syndrome/11p Deletion Syndrome
• AGR Triad
• Aniridia-Ambiguous Genitalia-Mental Retardation
• Aniridia-Wilms' Tumor Association
• Aniridia-Wilms' Tumor-Gonadoblastoma
• AWTA

What is WAGR Syndrome/11p Deletion Syndrome?
WAGR syndrome/11p deletion syndrome is a rare genetic syndrome in which there is a predisposition to several conditions, including certain malignancies, distinctive eye abnormalities, and/or intellectual disability. "WAGR" is an acronym for the characteristic abnormalities associated with the syndrome. The acronym stands for (W)ilms' Tumor, the most common form of kidney cancer in children; (A)niridia, partial or complete absence of the colored region of the eye(s) (iris or irides); (G) Genitourinary abnormalities, such as undescended testicles or hypospadias in males, or internal genital or urinary anomalies in females; and Mental (R)etardation (intellectual disability). A combination of two or more of these conditions is usually present in most individuals with WAGR syndrome/11p deletion syndrome.


Waldenström’s Macroglobulinemia

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Waldenström’s Macroglobulinemia is also known as:
• Macroglobulinemia
• Waldenstrom's Syndrome

What is Waldenström’s Macroglobulinemia?
Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WMG) is a malignant disorder of the bone marrow and lymphatic tissues, a type of lymphoma and characterized by the presence of abnormally large numbers of a particular kind of white blood cell known as B lymphocytes. As these cells accumulate in the body, excessive quantities of an antibody protein known as IgM are produced. Large amounts of IgM cause the blood to become thick and affects the flow of blood through the smaller blood vessels, leading to some of the symptoms of the disorder.


Walker Warburg Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Walker Warburg Syndrome is also known as:
• Muscular Dystrophy-Dystroglycanopathy [with brain and eye anomalies], Type A (MDDGA)
• Cerebroocular Dysplasia-Muscular Dystrophy Syndrome (COD-MD Syndrome)
• Hydrocephalus, Agyria, and Retinal Dysplasia (HARD Syndrome)

What is Walker Warburg Syndrome?
Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) is a rare multisystem disorder characterized by muscle, brain and eye abnormalities. WWS often leads to death in the first year of life, however, the specific symptoms and severity can vary greatly from person to person. WWS demonstrates autosomal recessive inheritance, with a recurrence risk of 1 in 4, or 25%, for a couple who has previously had a child diagnosed with this genetic condition.


Wandering Spleen

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Wandering Spleen is also known as:
• Displaced Spleen
• Drifting Spleen
• Floating Spleen
• Pelvic Spleen
• Splenic Ptosis
• Splenoptosis
• Systopic Spleen
• WS

What is Wandering Spleen?
Congenital wandering spleen is a very rare, randomly distributed birth defect characterized by the absence or weakness of one or more of the ligaments that hold the spleen in its normal position in the upper left abdomen. The disorder is not genetic in origin. Instead of ligaments, the spleen is attached by a stalk-like tissue supplied with blood vessels. If the pedicle is twisted in the course of the movement of the spleen, the blood supply may be interrupted or blocked to the point of severe damage to the blood vessels (infarction). Because there is little or nothing to hold it in place the spleen "wanders" in the lower abdomen or pelvis where it may be mistaken for an unidentified abdominal mass.


Warburg Micro Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Warburg Micro Syndrome is also known as:
• Micro Syndrome

What is Warburg Micro Syndrome?
Warburg Micro syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder. It is primarily characterized by problems with the eyes and with the growth and development of the brain, resulting in neurodevelopmental delay. Affected children have severe intellectual disability, and they experience delays in reaching, or fail to reach, normal developmental milestones. They may also have microcephaly, a condition that indicates that the head circumference is significantly smaller than would be expected based upon an infant’s age and gender.


Warm Antibody Hemolytic Anemia

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Warm Antibody Hemolytic Anemia is also known as:
• Idiopathic Warm Antibody Hemolytic Anemia
• Primary Warm Antibody Hemolytic Anemia
• Warm Antibody Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia
• Warm Reacting Antibody Disease

Subdivisions of Warm Antibody Hemolytic Anemia
• Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Secondary to IgM Autoantibodies
• Warm-Reactive AIHA Secondary to IgM

What is Warm Antibody Hemolytic Anemia?
Warm antibody hemolytic anemia is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the premature destruction of healthy red blood cells by autoantibodies. Autoimmune diseases occur when the body's natural defenses against foreign organisms (e.g., lymphocytes, antibodies) destroy healthy tissue for unknown reasons. Normally, red blood cells have a life span of approximately 120 days before they are removed by the spleen. Warm antibody hemolytic anemia is classified as an autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), an uncommon group of disorders in which the immune system mistakenly attacks healthy red blood cells.


Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

WAS Related Disorders are also known as:
• WAS
• Wiskott Aldrich Syndrome
• X-Linked Congenital Neutropenia
• X-Linked Thrombocytopenia

What are WAS Related Disorders?
The WAS-related disorders are a spectrum of conditions affecting the immune system that are caused by mutations in the WAS gene. The WAS gene abnormality results in a deficiency in the WASP protein that leads to a low platelet count. Affected individuals have an increased risk of developing lymphomas, especially after exposure to Epstein-Barr virus. WAS-related disorders are extremely variable, even in individuals in the same family.


Weaver Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Weaver Syndrome is also known as:
• Overgrowth Syndrome
• Weaver-Smith Syndrome
• WSS

What is Weaver Syndrome?
Weaver Syndrome is characterized by rapid growth. Usually starting before birth, physical growth and bone development can occur more quickly than average. Other symptoms can include increased muscle tone with exaggerated reflexes, slow development of voluntary movements, specific physical characteristics, and/or foot deformities. Babies with this syndrome have a hoarse low-pitched cry.


Wegener's Granulomatosis

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Wegener's Granulomatosis is also known as:
• Wegener's (formerly)

What is Wegener's Granulomatosis?
Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA, formerly called Wegener’s) is a rare disease of uncertain cause. It is the result of inflammation within the tissues called granulomatous inflammation and blood vessel inflammation ("vasculitis”) which can damage organ systems. The areas most commonly affected by GPA include the sinuses, lungs, and kidneys, but any site can be affected.


Weil Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Weil Syndrome is also known as:
• Fiedler Disease
• Icteric Leptospirosis
• Icterohemorrhagic Leptospirosis
• Infectious Jaundice
• Lancereaux-Mathieu-Weil Spirochetosis
• Leptospiral Jaundice
• Spirochetal Jaundice
• Weil Disease

What is Weil Syndrome?
Weil syndrome, a rare infectious disorder, is a severe form of the bacterial infection caused by Leptospira bacteria known as leptospirosis. In most cases, Weil syndrome occurs among individuals who are exposed to affected animals.


Weill Marchesani Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Weill Marchesani Syndrome is also known as:
• Congenital Mesodermal Dysmorphodystrophy
• Mesodermal Dysmorphodystrophy, Congenital
• Spherophakia-Brachymorphia Syndrome
• WMS
• WM Syndrome

What is Weill Marchesani Syndrome?
Weill Marchesani syndrome is a rare genetic disorder of connective tissue characterized by abnormalities of the lens of the eye, short stature, an unusually short, broad head and joint stiffness.


Weismann Netter Stuhl Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Weismann Netter Stuhl Syndrome is also known as:
• Anterior Bowing of the Legs with Dwarfism
• Skeletal Dysplasia, Weismann Netter Stuhl Type
• Toxopachyosteose Diaphysaire Tibio-Peroniere
• Weismann-Netter Syndrome

What is Weismann Netter Stuhl Syndrome?
Weismann-Netter-Stuhl syndrome is an extremely rare genetic skeletal disorder characterized by the abnormal development of bone (osseousbo dysplasia). Affected individuals exhibit bowing of the long portions (shafts) of the shinbone (tibia) and the outer, smaller bone of the leg below the knee (fibula). In some individuals, other bones may also be affected, such as the ribs, pelvis, spinal column, and/or bones in the arms. Affected individuals will have some degree of short stature, which means that they are shorter than would otherwise be expected based on their gender and age. The medical definition states that short stature is two standard deviations or more below the mean for children of the same age and gender. The final height of affected individuals will vary.


Werdnig-Hoffmann Disease

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Werdnig-Hoffmann Disease is also known as:
• Infantile Spinal Muscular Atrophy
• SMA 1
• SMA, Infantile Acute Form
• Spinal Muscular Atrophy Type 1
• Werdnig-Hoffman Paralysis

What is Werdnig-Hoffmann Disease
The spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs), are characterized by degeneration of nerve cells within the lowest region of the brain and certain motor neurons in the spinal cord leading to muscle weakness of the truncal, and extremity muscles initially, followed by chewing, swallowing and breathing difficulties. Motor neurons are nerve cells that transmit nerve impulses from the spinal cord or brain to muscle or glandular tissue.


Werner Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Werner Syndrome is also known as:
• Werner’s Syndrome
• Progeria of Adults
• WS

What is Werner Syndrome?
Werner syndrome is a rare progressive disorder that is characterized by the appearance of unusually accelerated aging (progeria). Although the disorder is typically recognized by the third or fourth decades of life, certain characteristic findings are present beginning during adolescence and early adulthood.


Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome is also known as:
• Korsakoff Amnesic Syndrome
• Korsakoff Psychosis
• Korsakoff Syndrome
• Psychosis Polyneurotica
• Wernicke Disease
• Wernicke Encephalopathy
• Wernicke Syndrome

What is Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome?
Wernicke syndrome and Korsakoff syndrome are related disorders that often occur due to a deficiency of thiamine (vitamin B1). Wernicke's syndrome, also known as Wernicke encephalopathy, is a neurological disease characterized by confusion, the inability to coordinate voluntary movement, and eye abnormalities. Korsakoff's syndrome is a mental disorder characterized by disproportionate memory loss in relation to other mental aspects. When these two disorders occur together, the term Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is used.

Some researchers believe Wernicke and Korsakoff syndromes are separate yet related disorders; others believe them to be different stages of the same disorder or disease spectrum. Wernicke syndrome is considered the acute phase with a shorter duration and more serious symptoms. Korsakoff syndrome is considered the chronic phase and is a long-lasting condition.


West Nile Encephalitis

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

West Nile Encephalitis is also known as:
• Eastern Equine Encephalitis
• EEE
• Japanese Encephalitis
• Kunjin Fever
• Venezuelan Encephalitis
• Viral Encephalitis
• WEE
• Western Equine Encephalitis
• West Nile Fever
• West Nile Virus
• WNE

What is West Nile Encephalitis?
There are seventeen species of birds that are the known carriers of and transmit West Nile Encephalitis (WNE) to humans.


West Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

West Syndrome is also known as:
• Epileptic Spasms
• Infantile Spasms

Subdivisions of West Syndrome
• X Linked Infantile Spasms

What is West Syndrome?
West syndrome is a constellation of symptoms characterized by epileptic/infantile spasms, abnormal brain wave patterns called hypsarrhythmia and intellectual disability. The spasms that occur may range from violent jackknife or "salaam" movements where the whole-body bends in half, or they may be no more than a mild twitching of the shoulder or eye changes. These spasms usually begin in the early months after birth and can sometimes be helped with medication.

There are many different causes of epileptic spasms. If a specific cause can be identified, a diagnosis of symptomatic epileptic spasms can be made. If a cause cannot be determined, a diagnosis of cryptogenic epileptic spasms is made.


WHIM Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

WHIM Syndrome is also known as:
• Warts, Hypogammaglobulinemia, Infections and Myelokathexis Syndrome

What is WHIM Syndrome?
WHIM syndrome is a rare primary immunodeficiency disorder, which are disorders in which the body’s immune system does not function properly. WHIM is an acronym for some of the characteristic symptoms of the disorder – (w)arts, (h)ypogammaglobulinemia, (i)nfections, and (m)yelokathexis. Individuals with WHIM syndrome are more susceptible to potentially life-threatening bacterial infections. To a lesser extent, they are also predisposed to viral infections. Affected individuals are particularly susceptible to human papillomavirus (HPV), which can cause skin and genital warts and potentially lead to cancer. Affected individuals have extremely low levels of certain white bloods in the blood.


Whipple Disease

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Whipple Disease is also known as:
• Intestinal Lipodystrophy
• Intestinal Lipophagic Granulomatosis
• Malabsorption Syndrome
• Secondary Non-tropical Sprue

What is Whipple Disease?
Whipple disease is a rare disease resulting from bacterial infection that leads to inadequate absorption of nutrients (malabsorption) from the intestine. It is believed to result from infection with bacteria known as Tropheryma whippelii. The infection usually involves the small intestine, but over time, the disease may affect various parts of the body, including the heart, lungs, brain, and eyes.


Wieacker Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Wieacker Syndrome is also known as:
• Apraxia, Oculomotor, with Congenital Contractures and Muscle Atrophy
• Contractures of Feet, Muscle Atrophy, and Oculomotor Apraxia
• Wieacker-Wolff Syndrome
• WRWF
• Intellectual Disability-Developmental Delay-Contractures Syndrome

What is Wieacker Syndrome?
Wieacker syndrome is a rare, slowly progressive, genetic disorder present at birth and characterized by deformities of the joints of the feet, muscle degeneration, mild intellectual disability and an impaired ability to move certain muscles of the eyes, face and tongue.


Wiedemann Rautenstrauch Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Wiedemann Rautenstrauch Syndrome is also known as:
• Neonatal Progeroid Syndrome
• Neonatal Pseudo-Hydrocephalic Progeroid Syndrome of WRS
• Rautenstrauch-Wiedemann Syndrome

What is Wiedemann Rautenstrauch Syndrome?
Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome (WRS), also known as neonatal progeroid syndrome, is a very rare genetic disorder characterized by an aged appearance at birth, growth delays before and after birth, and deficiency or absence of the layer of fat under the skin.


Wildervanck Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Wildervanck Syndrome is also known as:
• Cervico-Oculo-Acoustic Syndrome
• COA Syndrome

What is Wildervanck Syndrome?
Wildervanck syndrome, also known as cervicooculoacoustic syndrome, is a rare genetic disorder that primarily affects females. The disorder is characterized by a skeletal condition known as Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS); abnormalities of certain eye movements; and/or hearing impairment that is present at birth. In individuals with KFS, there is abnormal union or fusion of two or more bones of the spinal column within the neck. In some affected individuals, additional physical abnormalities may also be present.


Williams Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Williams Syndrome is also known as:
• Beuren Syndrome
• Early Hypercalcemia Syndrome with Elfin Facies
• Elfin Facies with Hypercalcemia
• Hypercalcemia-Supravalvar Aortic Stenosis
• WBS
• Williams-Beuren Syndrome
• WMS

What is Williams Syndrome?
Williams syndrome, also known as Williams-Beuren syndrome, is a rare genetic disorder characterized by growth delays before and after birth (prenatal and postnatal growth retardation), short stature, a varying degree of mental deficiency, and distinctive facial features that typically become more pronounced with age.


Wilms’ Tumor

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Wilms’ Tumor is also known as:
• Embryoma Kidney
• Embryonal Adenomyosarcoma Kidney
• Embryonal Carcinosarcoma Kidney
• Embryonal Mixed Tumor Kidney
• Nephroblastoma

What is Wilms’ Tumor?
Wilms' tumor is the most common form of kidney cancer in children, accounting for 6 to 8 percent of all childhood cancers. About 500 new cases are diagnosed in the USA per year. The exact cause is not known, although it is thought that in 10-15% of affected individuals, one or more mutated genes create a predisposition to Wilms' tumor. Typically, this disease first appears when the affected child is about three years old. Wilms' tumor can often be treated successfully, depending on the stage of the tumor at detection and the age and general health of the child.


Wilson Disease

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Wilson Disease is also known as:
• Hepatolenticular Degeneration
• Lenticular Degeneration, Progressive

What is Wilson Disease?
Wilson disease is a rare genetic disorder characterized by excess copper stored in various body tissues, particularly the liver, brain, and corneas of the eyes. The disease is progressive and, if left untreated, it may cause liver (hepatic) disease, central nervous system dysfunction, and death.


Winchester Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Winchester Syndrome is also known as:
• Winchester-Grossman Syndrome

What is Winchester Syndrome?
Winchester syndrome is an extremely rare connective tissue disorder believed to be closely related to the mucopolysaccharidoses, which is a group of hereditary metabolic diseases caused by the absence or malfunction of certain enzymes, leading to the accumulation in cells and tissues of molecules that would normally be broken down into smaller units. This syndrome is characterized by short stature, arthritis-like symptoms, nodules under the skin, coarse facial features, and eye and teeth abnormalities.


WNT4 Deficiency

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

WNT4 Deficiency is also known as:
• Biason-Lauber Syndrome
• Mullerian Aplasia and Hyperandrogenism
• WNT4 Mullerian Aplasia
• WNT4 Syndrome

What is WNT4 Deficiency?
WNT4 deficiency is a rare genetic disorder that affects females. It is characterized by the absence or underdevelopment of the uterus and sometimes absence or underdevelopment of the vagina. Affected females also experience abnormally high levels of androgens, which are male sex hormones.


Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome is also known as:
• 4p- Syndrome
• Pitt-Rogers-Danks Syndrome
• WHS
• Monosomy 4p

What is Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome?
Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is an extremely rare chromosomal disorder caused by a missing piece of the short arm of chromosome 4. Major symptoms may include extremely wide-set eyes with a broad or beaked nose, a small head, low-set malformed ears, growth deficiency, heart defects, intellectual disability, and seizures. The symptoms of this syndrome vary from person to person based the size and location of the missing piece of chromosome 4.


Wolff Parkinson White Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Wolff Parkinson White Syndrome is also known as:
• Accessory Atrioventricular Pathways
• Preexcitation Syndrome
• WPW Syndrome

What is Wolff Parkinson White Syndrome?
Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is a rare congenital heart disorder involving irregularities in the electrical system of the heart. In individuals with WPW syndrome, an abnormal alternate electrical pathway, exists between the atrium and the ventricle, resulting in abnormal heartbeat rhythms and faster than normal heartbeats.


Wolfram Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Wolfram Syndrome is also known as:
• Diabetes Insipidus, Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy and Deafness
• DIDMOAD

What is Wolfram Syndrome?
Wolfram syndrome is an inherited condition that is typically associated with childhood-onset insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and progressive optic atrophy. In addition, many people with Wolfram syndrome also develop diabetes insipidus and sensorineural hearing loss. An older name for the syndrome is DIDMOAD, which refers to diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness. Some people have mutations in the same gene that causes Wolfram syndrome but they do not get all the features of the syndrome, so they are said to have WFS1-related disorders.


Wolman Disease

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Blue Jeans Ribbon for Genetic Diseases

Wolman Disease is also known as:
• Acid Cholesteryl Ester Hydrolase Deficiency, Wolman Type
• Lysosomal Acid Lipase Deficiency, Wolman Type
• LAL Deficiency, Wolman Type

What is Wolman Disease?
Wolman disease is a type of lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) deficiency; a rare genetic disorder characterized by complete absence of an enzyme known as lysosomal acid lipase (LIPA or LAL). This enzyme is required to break down certain fats in the body. Without the LIPA enzyme, certain fats may abnormally accumulate in the tissues and organs of the body causing a variety of symptoms.


Worms (Cats)

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Paws Ribbon for Animal Diseases

What is Worms?
Cats may usually acquire worms through several ways. The most common method of worm transmission in adult cats is through ingestion of eggs from contact with infected feces. Tapeworms may be contracted through ingestion of fleas or through hunting and killing of wildlife or rodents. Hookworms may be transmitted through the skin by coming into contact with hookworm larvae in the environment. Pregnant and nursing cats may also transmit roundworms and hookworms through the placenta or milk to kittens.


Wyburn-Mason Syndrome

Awareness Ribbon Color:

Zebra Ribbon for Rare Diseases

Wyburn-Mason Syndrome is also known as:
• Bonnet-Dechaumme-Blanc Syndrome

What is Wyburn-Mason Syndrome?
Wyburn-Mason syndrome is an extremely rare nonhereditary disorder that is present at birth (congenital). Affected infants have arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), which are developmental abnormalities affecting the blood vessels, specifically the arteries, veins and capillaries.